In Search of the Real Bouillabaisse, Marseille’s Gift to the Fish Lover

During a yearlong celebration of its food, the city is filled with odd versions for tourists and fancy variations for the well-heeled. Finding an authentic specimen took some legwork.

By Elaine Sciolino – NEW YORK TIMES

  • Aug. 5, 2019

MARSEILLE, France — In this ancient port city on the Mediterranean, there is no escaping the dark, hot, earthy fish concoction known as bouillabaisse.

All around the Vieux Port, restaurants with multilingual menus lure tourists with the promise of an authentic taste of the city’s signature dish. One advertises in bright white lights a “bouillabaisse royale” with lobster on the side; another features a “petite” bouillabaisse at a bargain price. A third has created a “milkshake of bouillabaisse,” while yet another proposes a “bouillabaisse hamburger,” a fish fillet in a bun accompanied by fish soup and French fries.

Newsstands sell postcards bearing a recipe for bouillabaisse in French and English. Shops offer jars of concentrated bouillabaisse stock and prepared rouille, a sharp, garlicky mayonnaise with olive oil and a blend of saffron and other spices that is used to enliven the bouillabaisse broth.

In truth, few native Marseillaises eat bouillabaisse, and certainly only at home, never in a restaurant. Many snicker at those who come here and want the dish. The most inventive cuisine in the city these days, they say, is the pizza prepared on food trucks and the couscous served in North African restaurants.

Bouillabaisse sometimes seems as old-fashioned as coq au vin or blanquette de veau. Here, and all over France, it is often said you

can no longer find a classic rendition of the dish, which is something between a soup and a stew.

Yet there is also a rumor that bouillabaisse survives, especially in this city, which is celebrating its food this year with an initiative called Marseille Provence Gastronomy 2019 that includes cooking lessons, dinner concerts, wine-tastings, art exhibits and markets. To mark the occasion, a group of elementary-school students painted two large outdoor “bouillabaisse” murals featuring the rockfish necessary for the dish. So when I decided to seek out and taste the real thing, I came to Marseille.

The search wasn’t easy, as bouillabaisse is steeped in myths, tradition and gastronomic polemics.

The origin of the dish is the stuff of legends. One has it that Venus, the Roman goddess of love, invented bouillabaisse to put her husband, Vulcan, to sleep so she could be with her paramour Mars. Many food historians speculate that bouillabaisse is a descendant of kakavia, a traditional soup of the ancient Greeks, who colonized Marseille in about 600 B.C.

It developed over the centuries as a one-pot meal in which poor fishermen threw rockfish — several species of sea creatures, most of them ugly and at one time unsellable — fresh off the docks into a large iron caldron of boiling fish stock to feed the family. By the late 18th century, a version was served in restaurants.

In 1966, the New York Times food critic Craig Claiborne called bouillabaisse “a dish that is always good for controversy.” The debate over what constitutes a real bouillabaisse grew so fierce that a group of 11 local restaurateurs drew up the Marseille Bouillabaisse Charter in the 1980s, codifying the ingredients and preparation allowed.

Even now, there is no official governmental protection for the name bouillabaisse as there is for so many other French comestibles, from Champagne to Brie de Meaux.

Then there is downright trickery. Several years ago, an investigation by a French television channel revealed that many of the restaurants around the Vieux Port used processed ingredients and frozen fish of indeterminate origin.

In 1966, the New York Times food critic Craig Claiborne called bouillabaisse “a dish that is always good for controversy.” The debate over what constitutes a real bouillabaisse grew so fierce that a group of 11 local restaurateurs drew up the Marseille Bouillabaisse Charter in the 1980s, codifying the ingredients and preparation allowed.

On this visit, I stayed far away from the port area, where I had eaten my first, mediocre bouillabaisse years ago.

I also avoided the deconstructed, dressed-up and expensive interpretation at Gérald Passédat’s Michelin-starred restaurant Le Petit Nice, on the scraggly shoreline about two miles away. My Bouille Abaisse, as he calls it, consists of three courses: a raw shellfish starter, a selection of classic bite-size fish fillets covered in a light saffron-infused broth, and finally, a selection of deep-sea fish in a thick soup adorned with small crabs. With dessert, the price tag for the meal comes to 250 euros, about $280.

Marseille is a sprawling city that includes 111 neighborhoods called quartiers-villages, and I headed to one of them, the vacation spot Carry-le-Rouet, 20 miles northwest of the Vieux Port, to try what is reputed to be one of the best traditional versions in town. Bouillabaisse was never meant to be served in restaurants on demand; the dish is too expensive and difficult to make for a restaurant to gamble on the chance that a customer might want it.

So I ordered it two days in advance from a popular restaurant. The setting was picture-perfect, an open-air balcony overlooking a small port full of pleasure boats. But the meal was disappointing — the broth was a pretty shade of orange, but tepid and too tomatoey. Its side dish of half a chewy lobster was certainly not authentic.

Success came when I turned to a friend who knows the area. Friends of his who live along the coast suggested another restaurant, and spoke to the chef, who only occasionally makes bouillabaisse but agreed to prepare it for us.

On a hot Sunday in June, I drove 40 minutes east along the coastal road to the small fishing hamlet Les Goudes, the farthest point in Marseille before you hit the hidden inlets known as calanques. There is no post office or bank, and the tiny Roman Catholic church is seldom open for services. Clusters of small cottages, some of them no more than shacks, cling to the hillsides. Some were built in the days before building codes, and function with exposed electrical wiring. Many of the families who live here go back generations.

Here, the outdoor terrace of L’Esplaï du Grand Bar des Goudes is perched on the rocks overlooking a tiny fishing port; it is the place where native Marseillaises come for a long, languorous Sunday lunch.

The restaurant was filled with the smell of garlic and the sounds of loud chatter — even singing. (This is not Paris, where voices are kept low and soft.) From here, the clientele can see the main port, on the other side of the bay, where the big cruise ships dock.

On a hot Sunday in June, I drove 40 minutes east along the coastal road to the small fishing hamlet Les Goudes, the farthest point in Marseille before you hit the hidden inlets known as calanques. There is no post office or bank, and the tiny Roman Catholic church is seldom open for services. Clusters of small cottages, some of them no more than shacks, cling to the hillsides. Some were built in the days before building codes, and function with exposed electrical wiring. Many of the families who live here go back generations.

Here, the outdoor terrace of L’Esplaï du Grand Bar des Goudes is perched on the rocks overlooking a tiny fishing port; it is the place where native Marseillaises come for a long, languorous Sunday lunch.

The restaurant was filled with the smell of garlic and the sounds of loud chatter — even singing. (This is not Paris, where voices are kept low and soft.) From here, the clientele can see the main port, on the other side of the bay, where the big cruise ships dock.

The chef, Christophe Thullier, prepared his bouillabaisse the classic way. He made a stock using tiny scaled and gutted rockfish, fennel, tomatoes, a mixture of spices, olive oil and water. He boiled the stock furiously for 20 minutes until it thickened, then turned it down to a simmer before straining in a sieve.

At least five types of whole rockfish had marinated for several hours in white wine, olive oil, thyme, rosemary, saffron, paprika, turmeric and lots of garlic and saffron. Part of the ritual of bouillabaisse is the presentation of the marinated fish before they are filleted and thrown into the simmering broth “à la minute” — at the last minute. The word bouillabaisse derives from the Provençal bouï-abaisso, meaning “when the pot boils, lower the fire.”

Eric Para, the restaurant’s co-owner, brought a huge platter of fish to the table, including Saint Pierre (John Dory); vive (weever), a small eel-like creature with poisonous spines; galinette (gurnard); grondin rouge (red gurnard); congre (conger eel); rouget (red mullet); and both red and lean white varieties of rascasse, an ugly, spiny sea creature known as scorpion fish and an absolute must for any bouillabaisse worth its name. (“Alone, it is not particularly good eating, but it is the soul of bouillabaisse,” wrote the great food writer Waverley Root.) Eric Para, the restaurant’s co-owner, brought a huge platter of fish to the table, including Saint Pierre (John Dory); vive (weever), a small eel-like creature with poisonous spines; galinette (gurnard); grondin rouge (red gurnard); congre (conger eel); rouget (red mullet); and both red and lean white varieties of rascasse, an ugly, spiny sea creature known as scorpion fish and an absolute must for any bouillabaisse worth its name. (“Alone, it is not particularly good eating, but it is the soul of bouillabaisse,” wrote the great food writer Waverley Root.)

The broth was served first, with slices of crisply toasted baguette, whole cloves of raw garlic and rouille. The tradition here is to rub raw garlic onto the toasts, spoon generous dollops of the rouille on them and float them in the broth. Then came a second course: the just-cooked fish fillets with some broth ladled over them.

The soup, opaque and mud-colored was heavy, viscous and gritty, with small bits of fish settling on the bottom of the bowl.

“This is not for the faint of heart,” one of the other diners said. “This is not a dish appreciated by the young.”

Mr. Para concurred. “It’s an acquired taste, especially when you make it the correct way,” he said. “Frankly, for a special meal at home, I prefer a côte de boeuf.”

He had the highest praise for Mr. Passédat of Le Petit Nice, who is known as the “godfather” of the yearlong food initiative in Marseille and the ultimate cheerleader for bouillabaisse. “He is the star of the region and an artist,” Mr. Para said. “We’re not artists here.”

Food will always be better at its place of origin, and bouillabaisse purists have always believed that there is a mystical connection between the dish and the city.

“I always feel that part of Marseille itself is cooked right into the bouillabaisse,” Julia Child said on her television show “The French Chef” in 1970. “You can somehow just taste the flavor, the color, the excitement of that old port.”Perhaps that explains why, however hard it may be to find, bouillabaisse is likely to live on. Elaine Sciolino

L’Esplaï du Grand Bar des Goudes, 29 Rue Désiré Pelaprat (Rue du Chasseur), Marseille, France; grandbardesgoudes.fr Sophie Stuber contributed reporting.

Texte et photos : https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/05/dining/bouillabaisse-marseille-france.html

Aux avant-postes de la préservation de l’environnement : les Palaces

Hôtel des Trois Couronnes (Vevey) – Architecte Philippe Franel (1842)

Le 6 décembre 2018, l’Hôtel des Trois Couronnes accueillait à Vevey (Suisse) le second évènement du mouvement « Less saves the Planet » en réunissant une centaine de représentants du Gotha de l’hôtellerie Suisse et Monégasque, plus quelques membres de familles aristocratiques, pour les sensibiliser aux urgences climatiques. Cette initiative, précédée d’une manifestation initiale à Monte-Carlo le 19 septembre 2018 (Hôtel Métropole), est due à Fadi Joseph Abou et Flavio Bucciarelli, deux acteurs de l’activité du secteur, qui ont eu l’intuition que les grandes institutions hôtelières devaient être aux avant-postes de la lutte contre le réchauffement climatique puisque elles en étaient, pour partie, responsables.

Le dossier, solidement documenté, est présenté sur « Facebook – Less saves the Planet » et comporte une série de constats dont le plus spectaculaire est : « Aujourd’hui, passer de la consommation de 130 grammes par repas en protéines animales permettrait de réduire l’émission de gaz à effet de serre de moitié. » S’ensuit une démonstration sur l’incidence lourde, en matière d’émission de gaz, de la production céréalière destinée à nourrir les animaux, ainsi que les conséquences quasi identiques de la pêche industrielle, laquelle menace aussi la biodiversité. Les initiateurs de ce mouvement comptent sur une large prise de conscience des grands hôteliers, à commencer par les palaces, des chefs cuisiniers prestigieux pour mettre en pratique des recommandations qui s’appliquent aussi à la gestion des déchets, à la suppression d’ustensiles plastique qui polluent les océan, ainsi qu’à une éthique du bien-être animal. Un ouvrage est largement distribué pour expliquer les raisons de cette initiative et les conséquences bénéfiques que l’ont peut être en droit d’attendre.

Un pari audacieux.

Le modèle économique des palaces paraît aujourd’hui menacé, en France du moins, par un tourisme industriel de masse qui conteste son exemplarité. Le terrorisme crée des variations de clientèle erratiques. Le temps semble révolu où ces établissements, entre 2010 et 2013, connaissaient un taux de remplissage de 100 %, au moins cent jours par an. Mais les palaces parisiens en ont vu d’autres, notamment pendant l’Occupation (1940 – 1945) : le Majestic (aujourd’hui Peninsula) siège du haut commandement militaire allemand, le Meurice, siège du Gross Paris, le Crillon hôte du gouverneur militaire, le Ritz, siège de la Luftwaffe tandis que l’Abwer (renseignement) logeait au Lutetia !

Il est néanmoins utile de s’interroger sur l’origine des palaces et sur le rôle qu’avec les grands hôtels, ils pourraient désormais jouer dans cette guerre d’un nouveau genre : la préservation de l’environnement. Historiquement, la renommée d’un palace dépend autant de la notoriété de ses hôtes que des qualités éminentes de son personnel. Le Valaisan César Ritz (1850 – 1918) fut la figure tutélaire de la seconde génération de palaces en Europe, les Trois Couronnes à Vevey datant de 1842. Le palace reçoit doublement les habitués et les gens de la ville. C’est à la fois un lieu de séjour, de passage, de réunions, d’échanges, de contacts. Sa légende immortalisée par de grands écrivains fait vivre le présent. Le palace, de haute tradition luxueuse, est peu à peu devenu un cadre autour du repas, et sa cuisine un conservatoire un peu suranné. La gastronomie n’est apparue que dans les années 1990, comme élément de distinction entre les établissements.

Aujourd’hui, le mythe du palace ne fonctionne bien que si la clientèle ancienne, stars immortelles, hommes célèbres, beautés sans âge, milliardaires débonnaires, accepte de côtoyer une clientèle nouvelle qui fréquente le Spa et la piscine en habits de curistes, ou bien les hommes d’affaires en costumes sombres, voire les touristes fortunés du Moyen et Extrême Orient dans les bars, les salons, et les salles à manger aussi vastes que celles, autrefois, des paquebots de la Cunard, ou de la French Line.

Culture partagée

Le palace meuble encore la mémoire de luxe des grandes nations européennes, ranime les souvenirs des temps heureux et de la culture partagée. Cela marche encore. L’astuce étant de faire coïncider le vie inaccessible des people avec la curiosité des gens de bon goût et d’imagination des classes aisées. C’est ce qui fait la différence avec la tragédie uniformisée des hôtels standard à l’humeur glaciaire, sans service, sans cuisine, plantés à coté du tarmac de l’aéroport, et avec, tout de même, une addition sévère.

L’espace social d’un Palace est tissé par ses hôtes et par les qualités de son personnel. C’est ce qui en fait l’unique héritier des manières de vivre des deux siècles passés, le style de l’Europe des Temps modernes après le siècle des Lumières. Un Palace est un morceau de la civilisation de la vieille Europe. Il a su s’adapter, en France, avec l’arrivée des nouveaux propriétaires , l’aristocratie pétrolière du Moyen Orient, concurrencée aujourd’hui par de puissants groupes asiatiques. Mais la nouvelle clientèle, asiatique en particulier, risque de bouleverser l’ordre des choses établies. La Suisse, à cet égard, ne connaît pas la même situation, c’est pourquoi le tandem Fadi Joseph Abou et Flavio Bucciarelli ont choisi de sensibiliser l’hôtellerie helvétique capable, selon eux, d’être pionnière dans leur démarche environnementale et d’être un exemple pour la planète. Le pari vaut d’être tenté.

Jean-Claude Ribaut

Cécile Panchaud remporte le Grand Prix Joseph Favre

Cécile Panchaud (à gauche) avec l’équipe de l’hôtel des Trois Couronnes (Vevey)

Martigny (Suisse), petite bourgade de 20.000 habitant, située sur le Rhône avant qu’il n’atteigne le Lac Léman, était ce dimanche 25 novembre en proie à une singulière animation. Le Salon Epicuria accueillait la seconde édition du Grand Prix Joseph Favre, concours culinaire destiné à départager cinq jeunes cuisiniers valaisans, quatre hommes et une femme. Ils devaient se distinguer par leurs techniques de travail et la mise en valeur des goûts, en utilisant des produits suisses du terroir valaisan. Cette année, en 340 minutes, en direct et en public, ils devaient élaborer des plats originaux autour de la truite, du chevreuil, de la pomme et de la châtaigne et les soumettre à un jury international de haut niveau. Ce jury d’une douzaine de membres, présidé par Guy Savoy, comptait quelques célébrités venues d’Allemagne, du Danemark, de Suède, de Belgique et de Grèce, tous invités par Franck Giovannini, chef du restaurant l’Hôtel de Ville à Crissier (Suisse) qui préside à l’organisation du prix, créé en 2015 par Benoît Violier. La France était représentée par Michel Troisgros (Maison Troisgros à Roanne) et Christophe Marguin (Le Président à Lyon), patron des Toques Blanches Lyonnaises. Pierre-André Ayer (Fribourg), président des Grandes tables de Suisse, était également membre de ce jury.

La lauréate, Cécile Panchaud, 26 ans, qui occupe le poste de garde-manger et d’entremétier à l’hôtel des Trois Couronnes de Vevey, a su emporter la décision du jury avec, en entrée, une terrine de truite safranée et focaccia aux petits légumes croquants, suivie d’une selle de chevreuil habillée en croûte, épaule confite avec garniture de choux et des sous-bois, pomme de terre infusée au lard et sauce à la syrah valaisanne. Le dessert, avec les fruits imposés, se présentait comme un jardin automnal autour de la pomme et de la châtaigne.

Le public, enthousiaste, invité à soutenir les candidats, n’a pas mesuré ses encouragements dans une ambiance qui rappelait à certains le Bocuse d’Or. Outre la lauréate, c’est à Franck Giovannini que revient le mérite d’avoir parfaitement maîtrisé l’organisation de cet évènement et d’avoir ainsi concrétisé le rêve de Benoît Violier de rendre hommage au grand cuisinier suisse méconnu Joseph Favre.

Né à Vex dans le Valais (Suisse) Joseph Favre (1849 – 1903) est l’auteur d’un admirable « Dictionnaire universel de cuisine pratique » (1894 réédité en 2006 par Omnibus). Favre, membre dans sa jeunesse de la Fédération jurassienne, est à la fois cuisinier, militant et journaliste. Il crée également La Science culinaire (1877) qu’il dirige pendant sept ans, et en 1883, l’«Union Universelle pour le progrès de l’Art Culinaire». Elle fut rebaptisée, en 1888, «Académie Culinaire de France». C’est la plus ancienne association de Chefs de Cuisine et de Pâtisserie du monde ; elle compte aujourd’hui un millier de membres provenant de 27 nations sur les cinq continents.

Jean-Claude Ribaut


	

La « cuisine-monde » de Jimmy Desrivières

Depuis le changement de siècle, chacun a pu sentir que l’univers se transforme, celui des nourritures accomplit aussi sa mutation. Quelques-un ont cru que la chimie et l’industrie agroalimentaire allaient prendre le dessus dans l’univers des goûts. La cuisine moléculaire a tenté d’imposer ses vues. Echec retentissant. Mais l’on sent confusément poindre la fin d’une époque culinaire. C’est aux avant-postes des cuisines que l’on pressent ces vérités. Les cuisiniers patrouillent, devancent le gros des troupes, testent, expérimentent. Il y a actuellement sur le front des casseroles un bouillonnement de sens et d’orientations encore diffus mais sans doute inéluctable. Rares, cependant, sont les chefs qui peuvent se prévaloir d’une vision quasi planétaire de la question.

Nous en avons déniché un qui vient d’ouvrir un restaurant sous l’enseigne de « Pleine Terre », près des Champs Elysées à Paris. Ce nom est, à l’évidence, une critique de certaines pratiques agricoles hors sol, auxquelles sont soumises les tomates et les fraises, ou bien l’élevage. Il s’agit d’un chef antillais, Jimmy Desrivières, né en Martinique, dont la brillante carrière, en une vingtaine d’années, l’a conduit au sein de brigades prestigieuses : Georges Blanc à Vonnas, Alain Reix (Jules Verne), Marc Marchand (le Meurice). Il est secondé par Clément Van Peborgh (George V),  le  pâtissier  Jérémie (Pierre Gagnaire), le maître d’hôtel-sommelier, Edouard Vimond (Olivier Roellinger et Michael Caine, deux étoiles Michelin en Angleterre).

Dans un vaste espace au décor végétal contrastant avec un mur de moellons apparent, la brigade respecte quelques principes simples. En premier lieu, réduire la mise en place (c’est-à-dire la préparation à l’avance) au profit de la cuisson à la minute, à température contrôlée. Voici dès lors associées, les nuances du cuit et du cru, dans un plat de « Gamberone rouge mariné façon ceviche, piment et sel de citron. » L’apparente simplicité cache une grande précision d’exécution, pour un résultat spectaculaire et gourmand. Le chef n’a pas oublié le refrain entendu chez ses maîtres : privilégier le produit. La cardamome verte associée à la sauce grenobloise escorte superbement les saint-jacques de plongée. La sauce se fait discrète, disparaît avec le ravioli de champignons, au profit d’un jus tranché savoureux. Les liaisons sont ténues, mais elles existent. Ce sont de fines attaches. Le goût naturel des cocos de Paimpol n’exclut pas que le maigre – poisson fin de l’Atlantique Nord – soit accompagné de palourdes parfumées au piment d’Espelette, ou que le gingembre et la coriandre soutiennent le dialogue entre la daurade royale et l’artichaut. Quant au poulet bio de chez Fadi, cuit en croûte de sel et cacao de la Martinique, maïs grillé et gnocchi au poivre, sa sauce au chocolat rappelle irrésistiblement le « mole poblano », la fameuse volaille au chocolat que le roi Aztèque Moctezuma partagea en 1519 avec Hernan Cortez, chef de la meute espagnole qui venait d’envahir le Mexique.

Pour autant, il ne s’agit pas de cuisine-fusion, caricature grossière des années 1990 sous prétexte de mondialisation des goûts. Jimmy sait que la cuisine française ne doit pas seulement a elle même son épanouissement formel ; sa force a toujours résidé dans l’accueil qu’elle a su faire à des boutures étrangères, aux épices, à des produits nouveaux relevant d’ une gamme de goûts empreints de sensualité et un ordre de table connu pour être un style de vie français. La cuisine singulière de Jimmy Desrivieres et son équipe appartiennent à une catégorie de « cuisine-monde », au sens ou l’écrivain martiniquais Edouard Glissant, se livrait à une véritable re-fondation littéraire, au travers de concepts comme la « mondialité » en opposition à la mondialisation économique ou d’identité-relation contre l’affirmation des identités-racines qui génèrent d’innombrables conflits sur la planète. La cuisine de haut goût de Jimmy Desrivières adoucit les mœurs.

Menus : 29 € – 35 € (au déj.). Le soir : 45 €. A la carte : 80 € environ. Fumoir.

Pleine Terre, 15, rue Bassano 75116 – Paris. Tél. 09-81-76-76-10 : Fermé samedi et dimanche.

Jean-Claude Ribaut

A la carte :Gamberone rouge mariné façon ceviche, piment et sel de citron / Saint-jacques de plongée rôtie au beurre de cardamome verte, sauce grenobloise / Ravioli de champignon, jaune d’oeuf, poivre de Jamaïque, jus tranché / Daurade royale de ligne, artichaut, orange gingembre et coriandre / Maigre, fricassée de haricots de Paimpol au piment d’Espelette frais, palourdes et jus / Poulet bio de chez Fadi, cuit en croûte de sel et cacao de la Martinique, maïs grillé et gnocchi au poivre, sauce cacao / Desserts : chocolat des Caraïbes, crémeux praliné et poivres du monde – Figue de petit producteur et glace au miel.

Chardonnay – Sélection de l’Hôtel des Trois Couronnes à Vevey

J’ai dégusté récemment la cuvée « Chardonnay – Les Grands Terroirs » 2016, Sélection de l’Hôtel des Trois Couronnes à Vevey, élaborée par les Vins Keller pour Vincent Mattera le trés avisé manager F&B de ce splendide établissement. Il s’agit de vieilles vignes de chardonnay provenant de ce domaine familial d’une superficie d’environ 21 hectares de vignes à Vaumarcus (Canton de Neuchâtel en Suisse, à cheval entre Onnens (VD) et Auvernier (NE). Le chardonnay est issu du terroir de Bonvillars (Canton de Vaud) surplombant le lac de Neuchâtel, bénéficiant d’une exposition exceptionnelle. Le sol est de texture légère à moyenne, composé de calcaire. A certains endroits, la roche n’est qu’à une profondeur de 40 à 50 cm.  La conduite de la vigne est respectueuse de l’environnement selon les normes de Vinatura Swiss (interdiction des herbicides racinaires, limitation de l’emploi de cuivre, enherbement constant, utilisation minimale des sulfites). Elevage sur lies pendant onze mois dans des fûts de chêne bourguignon.

Dans le verre, la couleur or pâle bénéficie néanmoins d’une belle intensité. Au nez, on devine une certaine vigueur aromatique – fleurs blanches – promesse d’un moment de plaisir. En bouche, d’emblée se révèlent des arômes de pomme, de poire, et quelques nuances épicées, qui s’estompent lentement au profit d’un bouquet brioché, avec quelques notes de noisette. C’est un vin vif, précis, minéral sans excès, fruité sans abus. A déguster avec une volaille, un poisson de lac (omble, féra).

La question que je me pose devant cette pépite est de savoir si un tel vin aurait la capacité de vieillir ? Cette question taraude le milieu viticole helvétique depuis que le déclin des coopératives a rendu prospères les vignerons encaveurs indépendants, c’est-à-dire les viticulteurs qui, en Suisse, élèvent le vin de leur propriété et le vendent en bouteille sous leur responsabilité et leur étiquette. Pour mesurer si certains vins sont aptes au vieillissement, encore faudrait-il qu’ils soient conservés. Or la majorité des vins produits ( 1 million d’hectolitre pour 15 000 hectares) sont à boire dans l’année et tous sont aussitôt vendus localement. L’export représente moins de 2% du volume. L’idée est venue à quelques chroniqueurs spécialisés, d’avoir sélectionné à partir de l’année 2 000 quelques unes des meilleures bouteilles apte à la garde auprès d’une trentaine des meilleurs vignerons et d’avoir su les convaincre d’en céder soixante bouteilles par an à « La mémoire des vins suisses », association créée pour la circonstance. La démarche n’est pas commerciale, puisque les stocks sont inexistants et s’appuie sur une idée simple : « En matière de vin, le présent est le passé de demain. » Au-delà, il s’agit de renouveler l’image d’un vignoble éclaté en mini régions et innombrables microclimats (principalement Vaud, Valais, Genève, ainsi que le Tessin, la Suisse alémanique et la région des Trois Lacs) et autrefois dominés par le chasselas appelé aussi perlan, fendant ou dorin, qui avait envahi 68% du vignoble jusque dans les années 1950, proportion réduite à moins de 40% aujourd’hui. A mon sens, ce chardonnay mériterait amplement, bénéficiant en quelque sorte, de la notoriété et du mécénat de l’Hôtel des Trois Couronnes, d’entrer en lice aux côtés des grands vins suisses, afin de mesurer son évolution sur une décennie.

Jean-Claude Ribaut

La passion de Joël Robuchon

Joël Robuchon est décédé le 6 août 2018 à Genève, des suites d’un cancer du pancréas. Né le 7 avril 1945 à Poitiers, il fut une figure majeure de la gastronomie française dans le monde durant quatre décennies, grâce à ses nombreux établissements en Asie du Sud-Est, Japon, Etats Unis, totalisant plus d’une trentaine d’étoiles au guide Michelin. Dans ses jeunes années, ce fils de maçon et d’une femme de ménage, est « fasciné par le trait qui prend forme ». Il rêve d’être architecte ; puis il entre au Petit Séminaire, mais la greffe ne prend pas ; il se retrouve bientôt en cuisine. Il n’a que seize ans. « Tout pouvait m’arriver, même le pire, nous dit-il en 1994, si je n’avais rencontré à cette époque les Compagnons du tour de France. » Ce sera désormais sa famille. Il deviendra compagnon en janvier 1966 et fera sienne la devise : « L’homme doit se réaliser par la qualité de son travail. » C’est bientôt mai 68 ; cette conviction l’aide à franchir les années de doute. Il devient alors une bête à concours et les gagne un à un, jusqu’au prix de Meilleur Ouvrier de France, le plus prestigieux, en 1976. Joël Robuchon jugeait sévèrement cette période : « J’avais appris les bases, mais je ne faisais que réciter un code. » Quand a-t-il pris conscience de son destin ? «  Seulement, après ma rencontre avec le compagnonnage. » Une prédestinantion tout au plus, car Joël Robuchon situait sa rencontre avec la « grâce » vers 1978, au petit matin, alors qu’une grand-mère lui apportait « un panier de morilles fumantes », sans doute imprégnées de rosée après la cueillette. « J’ai eu un moment de béatitude, nous dit-il bien plus tard, et l’idée du plat que j’allais créer, son image et aussi sa saveur se sont imposées à moi. » C’est le moment intime de la création, « l’instant où Cézanne voit en peinture » décrit par le philosophe Merleau-Ponty ! Alors, artiste ou artisan ? Robuchon ne tranche pas. « La racine est la même », dit-il : il n’avait pas oublié le latin appris au Petit Séminaire. Tout au long de sa carrière Joël Robuchon a ressenti cette même vibration devant un beau produit. L’architecte « voit » en volumes ; lui, en goûts, en textures, en saveurs.

La haute cuisine de Joël Robuchon est une exception déroutante. A force d’être incongrue, elle devient un style, où chaque élément pris en soi atteint une perfection de texture, de cuisson et de saveur. C’est le sort envié du merlan frit Colbert, beurre aux herbes, qui a ses inconditionnels dans chacun de ses établissements. Le moelleux saisi de la cuisson du bar en peau, le suc affleurant des petits fenouils qui se marie élégamment au jus vinaigré, une touche asiatique sans être cela exactement. La juste description d’une telle cuisine est certes l’analyse d’un savoir-faire – un protocole d’exécution – dont on ne souligne que les traits au détriment du rappel d’une tradition culinaire et culturelle plus vaste et qui la sous-tend, rappelait le sociologue Claude Fischler. Tradition que l’on dirait aujourd’hui évaporée, chez tous ceux – de plus en plus nombreux, hélas ! – qui font de la « cuisine moyenne. » Cela veut dire que tout aura été cuit auparavant, puis assemblé à la demande. Que la qualité, respectable cependant, du poisson ou de la viande ne produira aucun mariage de simples saveurs. Sa mort, non loin de Lausanne où son alter ego et ami, le grand chef Fredy Girardet, a pris sa retraite, n’a pas surpris ce dernier. «Il m’avait appelé il y a trois semaines de Genolier, où il suivait un dernier traitement, avec une toute petite voix. Il m’a dit qu’il allait mourir et il m’a demandé de venir le voir. J’y suis allé plusieurs fois avant qu’il ne retourne dans son appartement à Genève, où il est décédé, témoigne Fredy Girardet. J’attendais le téléphone qui m’annoncerait son départ.»

Jean-Claude Ribaut

Alléno – Okazaki : Cuisines en résonance

Le 6 novembre 1878, Edmond de Goncourt note dans son Journal :  » Hier, chez Charpentier les Japonais ont apporté de la cuisine fabriquée par eux… une cuisine très civilisée… dont les produits donnent aux papilles un tas de petites sensations délicates, complexes et fugitives. » Les échanges gastronomiques franco-japonais suscités par l’Exposition Universelle de 1878, ont 140 ans ! Cette année ( juin 2018- février 2019), la France et le Japon célèbrent le 160ème anniversaire des échanges diplomatiques entre les deux pays, sur le thème « Japonismes 2018 : les âmes en résonance. » Le moment est donc bien choisi par le chef Yannick Alléno pour aménager l’ancien bar du rez-de-chaussée du Pavillon Ledoyen que Laurence Bonnel-Alléno a transformé en comptoir-à-sushi immaculé d’une douzaine de places et d’autant de banquettes et sièges autour de tables basses. La passion de Yannick Alléno pour le vrai sushi est ancienne. Et chaque voyage au Japon ravive son attirance pour « ces goûts fabuleux » et cette « gestuelle orchestrée, millimétrée, parfaite », véritable spectacle qu’il projète bientôt de recréer à Paris. L’occasion se présente en novembre 2016, lors d’une rencontre avec le chef sushi Yasunari Okazaki qui, dix huit mois plus tard, accepte de jouer le jeu. Une équipe est constituée autour de lui, un personnel flamboyant, un sommelier très averti sur les sakés, boisson d’obligation avec cette cuisine.

La préparation des sushis obéit à un cérémonial longtemps resté confidentiel, mais que  Yasunari Okazaki accepte de faire comprendre, sinon partager, tant l’exerice est complexe, à une douzaine de convives face au comptoir, les yeux rivés sur ses gestes. Il ne faut en effet pas moins d’une dizaine d’années pour former un maître chef-sushi (sushiya) capable de cuire et d’assaisonner le riz selon l’usage, d’affûter lui-même ses couteaux, de choisir le poisson et de le découper en fines lamelles avant d’assembler le tout avec la dextérité d’un magicien. Car la découpe du poisson cru, ou à peine tiédi, requiert non seulement une attention extrême portée au produit (thon, bar, langoustines, turbot), au fil de sa chair selon qu’il est découpé en darne ou en filet, mais aussi au maniement de l’instruments de découpe, un couteau triangulaire à lame d’airain qu’il faut tenir d’une main ferme, l’index pointé au-delà du manche. L’on observe vite que le sushi n’est pas une recette de poisson mais de riz tant sa préparation et son assaisonnement vinaigré exigent de précautions. Il existe en effet plusieurs variantes de sushi : oshi (pressé), maki (roulé), et bo (en barre), chirashi (méli-mélo). Le nigiri-sushi est la variation la plus récente, imaginée au XIXème siècle à l’époque où Tokyo s’appelait encore Edo, qui consiste en une boulette de riz vinaigré couverte d’abord de poissons salés ou légèrement cuits. « C’est seulement après la seconde guerre mondiale et le développement de la réfrigération, explique Mme Emi Kazuko spécialiste de l’art culinaire du Japon, que l’on a commencé à utiliser du poisson cru. » Encore faut-il manier avec aisance ladite boulette de riz au creux d’une main humide pour lui donner la consistance appropriée.

A l’Abysse, la série variable des sushis est précédée de petites entrées – tofu de petits pois, gelée d’algue kombu, accompagnées de divers ingrédients savoureux et d’extractions (d’algues, de betterave) qui sont la signature originale du chef français. Yannick Alleno a même convaincu son partenaire japonais de présenter un sushi de langoustine à l’extraction de céleri, sur riz mariné mêlé à du sésame torréfié et une fermentation de takuan (navet japonais), accompagnés d’une royale et d’une extraction de navet. Il ne s’agit pas d’une tentative de fusion des cuisines française et japonaise. Les goûts recherchés appartiennent à la table d’aujourd’hui, avec ses avancées, ses nouveautés, ses techniques imparables. Yannick Alléno récuse la cuisine attrape l’œil ; son intervention se limite aux nuances de goût. Les saveurs recherchées dans ces petites entrées, s’inscrivent à la rencontre des deux mondes, sans concession majeure à l’un ou à l’autre. La musicienne Barbara Carlotti qui a séjourné au Japon, apprécie avec moi ces subtiles digressions et évoque une troisième voie entre deux mondes. Une troisième voie ? On songe au mot de Chabrier sur la musique : « il y a la bonne, la mauvaise et celle d’Ambroise Thomas. »

L’ordre de la cuisine japonaise est ténu. C’est le monde de la miniature, le grain de poivre minimal du souvenir. La cuisine japonaise est une cuisine des usages, où le geste précis signifie un mode d’être, et induit une esthétique. Celle du passage parmi les choses incertaines et « mouvantes. » Ne pas se gaver, découvrir le concentré, comme ces « fleurs du cerisier qui s’envolent au vent du printemps aigre. » La cuisine, comme l’art, note Tanizaki, auteur inégalé de « Eloge de l’ombre », s’enracine au plus profond de la mémoire du Japon.

Longtemps l’engouement des chefs français pour l’esthétique de la table japonaise n’a retenu que le protocole visible: le savoir disposer, l’art de la découpe, l’ornement plus que l’esprit qui est d’ascèse, et certainement pas l’utilisation du soja, des végétaux, ou des algues. On a pu comparer cette esthétique empruntée avec la démarche des peintres Nabis qui s’étaient emparés des fameuses estampes japonaises de l’Ukijo-e, « images du monde flottant. »

Le cœur de l’énigme est celui-ci. La cuisine japonaise vue par Yannick Alléno valorise l’héritage d’une technique complexe, assortie d’une simplicité de propos, d’aspect et de présentation. De légères interférences toutefois peuvent se produire : petits défis techniques fragmentaires ou insolites qui incitent à la mutation, et limitent l’académisme auquel, cependant, s’adosse volontiers la cuisine japonaise. Emprunt, réemploi, influence, parfaitement maîtrisés traduisent les pénétrations d’un monde à l’autre, comme un jeu de transformations réciproques : les estampes japonaises qui, un moment, se sont imposées au regard de Van Gogh ou de Gaugin, étaient de bien modestes témoignages de l’art nippon qui poussèrent cependant la peinture occidentale à évoluer. Yannick Alléno sait que la cuisine française ne doit pas seulement a elle même son épanouissement formel ; sa force a toujours résidé dans l’accueil qu’elle a su faire à ces boutures étrangères. Il démontre magistralement à l’Abysse, au détour de quelques amuses-bouche et desserts inconnus de l’Empire du soleil levant, que la réciproque est vraie. Menu : 98 € (déj.) – Menu Rencontre : 170 € – Menu Omakasé : 280 € Accords thé, saké : 90 €.

L’Abysse – Pavillon Ledoyen, Carré des Champs-Elysées – 8, avenue Dutuit – 75008 Paris Tél. : 33 1 53 05 10 00. Ouvert midi et soir du mardi au samedi. Voiturier.